(Photo Poem) A Prayer to Divine Mother Within by Amina Rodriguez

Photo by Amina Rodriguez

Divine Mother within; show me what I have been,

What I am and what I shall become

Divine Mother within, show me all the pain I carry,

For all women in my lineage before me

I release all of their pain and in the process all of my future selves will now know freedom.

Divine Mother within; show me all who lived before me,

Show me any pain left to be released

Show me who we will be, show me what we shall become

For within us I know lies the key to our freedom. Continue reading

(Essay 3) Magoist Calendar: The Mago Time inscribed in Sonic Numerology by Helen Hye-Sook Hwang

Art by Liz Darling

[Author’s Note: This is my latest research that has led me to restore the 13-month, 28-day Mago Calendar, which will be included at the end of its sequels. A revised version of these essays is coming as a monograph, Magoist Calendar, The Mago Time inscribed in Sonic Numerology, forthcoming in 2017 by Mago Books.]

THE SECOND CALENDAR

Then, the Earth had increasingly so much work in all regions. Biodiversity went overboard. The terrestrial song became uncontrollable. The initial calendar became defunct. Lifeforms were left uncoordinated. The Earth fell into disorder, as she had no one to tune the song of earthlings in harmony with the cosmic music of creativity. The Earth was in need of sentient beings who could undertake the task. Mago’s descendants were to be born. Humans were entrusted to cultivate the earthly sound property by the Nine Mago Creatrix. The Budoji writes: Continue reading

(Essay 2) Divining the Masculine by Bart Everson

Do you believe in rocks?

Do you believe in rocks? Photo by Bart Everson

[This essay was originally published in the book, Finding the Masculine in Goddess’ Spiral: Men in Ritual, Community, and Service to the Goddess (2016, Immanion Press)].

These ideas are not very original. They must be amongst the oldest and most primal religious impulses. As a child of my era, however, I was drawn to scientific theories on the subject, in particular Gaia theory as formulated by James Lovelock and Lynn Margulis. (Oberon Zell formulated the same basic theory at the same time, but I was not familiar with his work). In simplest form, Gaia theory proposes a holistic view of the planet, looking at the Earth as a single organism. Naming the theory after the ancient Greek Earth goddess alienated many scientists but captured the popular imagination. Continue reading

(Art) The Empty Womb by Liz Darling

The experience of becoming a mother transformed the way I view the female body and the creation of life. Inspired by performing in Eve Ensler’s “The Vagina Monologues,” I use the vulva as a symbol of female power. Continue reading

(Book Excerpt 2) Single Mothers Speak on Patriarchy Ed. by Trista Hendren & Pat Daly

Introduction by Trista Hendren

Many people have wondered why I am going off track with my Goddess work to write about single mothers. To me, it’s all related.

The way we treat mothers is indicative of how we view The Mother.

Under patriarchy, the mother is feared and hated, quite crazily, both for her power and her weakness; everything a man cannot courageously accept about himself is projected onto his mother, or wife.” –Monica Sjoo & Barbara Mor[i]

To me, honoring real life mothers is just as important as setting aside our indoctrination to believe in a male God. Continue reading

(Book excerpt) Mother Medusa: Regenerative One by Glenys Livingstone Ph.D.

 

An essay from the forthcoming anthology Re-visioning Medusa: from Monster to Divine Wisdom edited by Glenys Livingstone Ph.D., Trista Hendren, and Pat Daly.

I first saw Her in myself, and gave voice to Her, after I had given a paper on Women and Religion, at the Women and Labour Conference in Australia in 1980; and the paper had attracted quite a bit of media attention. I felt myself to be seen as She was: that is, as some-thing completely out in and of, the wilderness – though I did not yet correctly name Her: I did not really know who She was at that time. I did not know my heritage then – my Hera-tage: it was only just beginning to emerge from the Great Below. As a method of processing this experience I had a dialogue with Society as an entity. It proceeded thus:

Continue reading

(Poetry) Nature’s Grace by Amina Rodriguez

Photography by Amina Rodriguez

Nature reached out to me…

Through the window in my room through a tree..

Through reaching branches and rustling leaves…

I grabbed on to her without hesitation..

Without a thought without question…

I felt her branches and grasped them tightly…

What a graceful invitation…

Unasked and unwarranted..

At the time what I understood was this thought which has stayed with me still… Continue reading

(Prose) Spring Rain by Sara Wright

Photo by Sara Wright.

For the last couple of days we have had cloudy weather with a few irregular cloudbursts bringing much needed rain to our Juniper clustered high desert…When it rains earth tones deepen and the stones that line my paths standout like people. Perhaps they are Kachinas, after all.

Kachinas are on my mind because these holy people come down from the mountains to help the Tewa  pueblo peoples invoke the rain – gods that will help the crops grow. Squash, corn, and beans remind me that the Three Sister’s technology lives on. The Kachinas have been around since the winter solstice but they stay hidden until the spring dances begin at the pueblos… Continue reading

(Prose) Re-membering Women’s Wisdom by Kaalii Cargill

Once upon a time, when “God was a woman”[i], anywhere from 35000 years ago until about 3500 years ago in some parts of the world, the life-giving power of Goddess was deeply respected. Consistent with this, women were respected as life-givers, and the functions of pregnancy, birth, and nurturing were valued as reflections of Great Nature,  the Mother of all. The rhythms and cycles of Nature were honoured in ceremonies and rituals, in daily practices that reflected a reverence for the life-giving principle.

Over the last few thousand years, this has changed so that the world in which we now live has little of this respect and acknowledgement. These changes have resulted in the loss of ancient ways of knowing. Continue reading