(Photo Poem) A Prayer to Divine Mother Within by Amina Rodriguez

Photo by Amina Rodriguez

Divine Mother within; show me what I have been,

What I am and what I shall become

Divine Mother within, show me all the pain I carry,

For all women in my lineage before me

I release all of their pain and in the process all of my future selves will now know freedom.

Divine Mother within; show me all who lived before me,

Show me any pain left to be released

Show me who we will be, show me what we shall become

For within us I know lies the key to our freedom. Continue reading

(Prose) Cardea by Deanne Quarrie

“Ovid says of Cardea, apparently quoting a religious formula: ‘Her power is to open what is shut; to shut what is open.’ …”
Robert Graves, in the White Goddess

The Roman Goddess, Cardea, was keeper of the doors and had as Her principal protective emblem, a bough of Hawthorne. In the Celtic year, June is the month of the Oak, “Duir” and is considered the hinge of the year (the seventh of thirteen moon cycles).

She looks both forward and backward in time. Benefactress of crafts people, she lives in a starry castle at the hinge of the universe behind the North Wind. She is the Keeper of the Four Winds.

She is honored at her festival, Beltane, and is also honored during the month of June – which is known as the “hinge of the year.” Continue reading

(Art) The Empty Womb by Liz Darling

The experience of becoming a mother transformed the way I view the female body and the creation of life. Inspired by performing in Eve Ensler’s “The Vagina Monologues,” I use the vulva as a symbol of female power. Continue reading

(Book excerpt) Mother Medusa: Regenerative One by Glenys Livingstone Ph.D.

 

An essay from the forthcoming anthology Re-visioning Medusa: from Monster to Divine Wisdom edited by Glenys Livingstone Ph.D., Trista Hendren, and Pat Daly.

I first saw Her in myself, and gave voice to Her, after I had given a paper on Women and Religion, at the Women and Labour Conference in Australia in 1980; and the paper had attracted quite a bit of media attention. I felt myself to be seen as She was: that is, as some-thing completely out in and of, the wilderness – though I did not yet correctly name Her: I did not really know who She was at that time. I did not know my heritage then – my Hera-tage: it was only just beginning to emerge from the Great Below. As a method of processing this experience I had a dialogue with Society as an entity. It proceeded thus:

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(Prose) Re-membering Women’s Wisdom by Kaalii Cargill

Once upon a time, when “God was a woman”[i], anywhere from 35000 years ago until about 3500 years ago in some parts of the world, the life-giving power of Goddess was deeply respected. Consistent with this, women were respected as life-givers, and the functions of pregnancy, birth, and nurturing were valued as reflections of Great Nature,  the Mother of all. The rhythms and cycles of Nature were honoured in ceremonies and rituals, in daily practices that reflected a reverence for the life-giving principle.

Over the last few thousand years, this has changed so that the world in which we now live has little of this respect and acknowledgement. These changes have resulted in the loss of ancient ways of knowing. Continue reading

(Meet Mago Contributor) Jack Dempsey, Ph.D.

Jack Dempsey (b. 1955) began writing freelance in New York City, and published Ariadne’s Brother: A Novel on the Fall of Bronze Age Crete in 1996. With his Ph.D. in Native and Early American Studies from Brown University, Jack wrote, edited and produced four books and two films in those fields, including New English Canaan by Thomas Morton of Merrymount; Mystic Fiasco: How the Indians Won The Pequot War, and Nani: A Native New England Story. Working on People of the Sea since the 1990s, Jack created the collaborative multimedia website Ancientlights.org, and revealed ancient Western astronomy with Continue reading

(Prose) Níðhöggr by Deanne Quarrie

Nidhogg

Art by Deanne Quarrie.

I am a student of Northern European/Old Icelandic Seidr. What I find particularly fascinating in my studies are not the deities but rather the creatures living on the World Tree along with the Primordial Giants who predated the gods.

One such creature is Níðhöggr, the “Derision Striker.” Níðhöggr is a great dragon who lives at the base of Yggdrasil, the World Tree. She gnaws on the roots of the tree, stimulating new growth. Her home stretches from icy Niflheim, near what is called the “Roaring Kettle”, the sacred well of all the rivers of Niflheim, all the way to Dead Man’s Shore in Helheim where she devours the piled corpses.

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(Prose) Three Sisters by Deanne Quarrie

From time to time I dive into the idea of seeing the Triple Goddess as Sisters rather than Mother, Maiden, Crone.  I must confess that the idea of Sister Goddesses, complete in their familial connectedness, representing unity, connection, and interdependency, is very appealing.  We, who practice Goddess Spirituality, strive in our relationships to reflect this in our work together.  Shared power!

If I were to look at the sisterhoods individually, I enjoy the Ananke and the Moirae from Greek mythology.  I like them because they represent a balance.  One side setting the standards and the other, enforcing them!  A perfect example of the laws of cause and effect! Continue reading

(Art) Transformation by Liz Darling

Art by Liz Darling

The experience of becoming a mother transformed the way I view the female body and the creation of life. Inspired by performing in Eve Ensler’s “The Vagina Monologues,” I use the vulva as a symbol of female power. Continue reading

(Essay) Samhain/Deep Autumn Ceremony by Glenys Livingstone Ph.D.

shed-skins-and-threadAt the base of the inspirations for this seasonal rite as I have scripted it, is Robin Morgan’s poem “The Network of the Imaginary Mother”,[1] and some portions of the script are directly her words. This whole poem had moved me for years, and I had dramatized parts of it in ceremony before, but the particular passage that was now finding a place in the celebration of Samhain is this one:

Drawn from the first by what I would become,

I did not know how simple this secret could be.

The carapace is split, Continue reading

(Prose) Noli me tangere by Nane Jordan

Photo by Nane Jordan

Photo by Nane Jordan

Amazing, I am holed up (as in: a refuge, a cave) for three days in St. Maximin, an ancient little village holding the gothic basilica of Mary Magdalene. Her relics, especially her skull, are on display in the crypt, sheathed in gold, and held by golden angels. The small stone entrance to this crypt is inviting, a quiet place to dwell underground with her mysteries. Horseshoe carvings, all over the walls that go down into the crypt, are inscribed into the stone by pilgrims past.

This cathedral housing her mortal remains is run down, in need of repair. It is like a relic itself, with its crumbling stone facade. But there is the beauty of what is falling down, the ancient feeling of such a place.

Continue reading