(Meet Mago Contributor) Dr. Moses Seenarine

Dr. Moses Seenarine is the author of “Cyborgs Versus the Earth Goddess: Men’s Domestication of Women and Animals and Female Resistance” (2017) by Xpyr Press. Seenarine is a graduate of Columbia University and a former Assistant Professor at Hunter College, City University of New York. He is the author of “Recasting Indian Women in Colonial Guiana: Gender, labor and caste in the lives of indentured and free laborers,” (1998) and Voices from the Subaltern: Education and Empowerment Among Dalit (Untouchable) Women in India (2004) by Mellen Press. Seenarine’s work on women and caste in India has been cited by the FAO, UNESCO, Human Rights Continue reading

(Prose) White ink: Gifted with/in the presence of women by Nane Jordan

Spending two days on retreat with Gestare last week, a women’s art collective I co-founded 5 years ago. Gestare is an artful and nourishing part of my life. Though it has been an at times challenging over-commitment for me, amidst my time-pressured life of work and mothering young family. But I have hung onto and in our artistic collaborations, knowing I want to be there. And wow, have we been busy, in a steady-progress-kinda-way, when you see what we have been up to over these years. Continue reading

(Prose) Fire, Her Bright Spirit by Deanne Quarrie

Center

Art by Deanne Quarrie

In Celtic Tradition our world is composed of Three Realms, those of Land, Sea and Sky. In the midst of these Realms we find the Sacred Grove, the place of flowing together. There the Sacred Fire burns, by the Well of Wisdom, beneath the World Tree. Sacred Fire is that which weaves itself throughout the Three Realms. It connects us and all of life to the Realms as well as to our gods and goddesses. Fire is Sacred Spirit, Sacred Inspiration, without which life would have no meaning.

And so we come to Fire. We have taken a look at Body/Earth, Breath/Air, Water/Sacred Source and now Fire/Sacred Inspiration. It is the spark, the flame, the heat of passion. It is what ignites our creativity, fuels our passion and fires our hearts to love. It is the Dance of Life, the joy found in movement, sexual energy and the warmth that germinates new life in seeds. It is the warmth of sunlight on our skin and the ecstatic pleasure of orgasm. Continue reading

(Art Poem) Behold by Shiloh Sophia

behold

Art by Shiloh Sophia

Today
Walk to the edge of yourself
See a door you have never seen before.
Don’t knock.
Don’t ask if anyone is home.
Just behold: Access.
Then without further consideration,
Dive in.
Once inside ask:
Who lives in here?
If it is silent,
Enjoy the strange break from all the voices,
for once they may not know what to say.
If it is filled with suggestions and tirades
kindly ask again.
Who lives in here?
(This is sacred space.)
It isn’t about the answer of course.
This is about what happens in the act
of asking in earnest, about the real you.
Something not enough of us really do. Continue reading

(Essay 2) Divining the Masculine by Bart Everson

Do you believe in rocks?

Do you believe in rocks? Photo by Bart Everson

[This essay was originally published in the book, Finding the Masculine in Goddess’ Spiral: Men in Ritual, Community, and Service to the Goddess (2016, Immanion Press)].

These ideas are not very original. They must be amongst the oldest and most primal religious impulses. As a child of my era, however, I was drawn to scientific theories on the subject, in particular Gaia theory as formulated by James Lovelock and Lynn Margulis. (Oberon Zell formulated the same basic theory at the same time, but I was not familiar with his work). In simplest form, Gaia theory proposes a holistic view of the planet, looking at the Earth as a single organism. Naming the theory after the ancient Greek Earth goddess alienated many scientists but captured the popular imagination. Continue reading

(Prose) Cardea by Deanne Quarrie

“Ovid says of Cardea, apparently quoting a religious formula: ‘Her power is to open what is shut; to shut what is open.’ …”
Robert Graves, in the White Goddess

The Roman Goddess, Cardea, was keeper of the doors and had as Her principal protective emblem, a bough of Hawthorne. In the Celtic year, June is the month of the Oak, “Duir” and is considered the hinge of the year (the seventh of thirteen moon cycles).

She looks both forward and backward in time. Benefactress of crafts people, she lives in a starry castle at the hinge of the universe behind the North Wind. She is the Keeper of the Four Winds.

She is honored at her festival, Beltane, and is also honored during the month of June – which is known as the “hinge of the year.” Continue reading

(Book excerpt) Mother Medusa: Regenerative One by Glenys Livingstone Ph.D.

 

An essay from the forthcoming anthology Re-visioning Medusa: from Monster to Divine Wisdom edited by Glenys Livingstone Ph.D., Trista Hendren, and Pat Daly.

I first saw Her in myself, and gave voice to Her, after I had given a paper on Women and Religion, at the Women and Labour Conference in Australia in 1980; and the paper had attracted quite a bit of media attention. I felt myself to be seen as She was: that is, as some-thing completely out in and of, the wilderness – though I did not yet correctly name Her: I did not really know who She was at that time. I did not know my heritage then – my Hera-tage: it was only just beginning to emerge from the Great Below. As a method of processing this experience I had a dialogue with Society as an entity. It proceeded thus:

Continue reading

(Prose) Níðhöggr by Deanne Quarrie

Nidhogg

Art by Deanne Quarrie.

I am a student of Northern European/Old Icelandic Seidr. What I find particularly fascinating in my studies are not the deities but rather the creatures living on the World Tree along with the Primordial Giants who predated the gods.

One such creature is Níðhöggr, the “Derision Striker.” Níðhöggr is a great dragon who lives at the base of Yggdrasil, the World Tree. She gnaws on the roots of the tree, stimulating new growth. Her home stretches from icy Niflheim, near what is called the “Roaring Kettle”, the sacred well of all the rivers of Niflheim, all the way to Dead Man’s Shore in Helheim where she devours the piled corpses.

Continue reading

(Prose) Three Sisters by Deanne Quarrie

From time to time I dive into the idea of seeing the Triple Goddess as Sisters rather than Mother, Maiden, Crone.  I must confess that the idea of Sister Goddesses, complete in their familial connectedness, representing unity, connection, and interdependency, is very appealing.  We, who practice Goddess Spirituality, strive in our relationships to reflect this in our work together.  Shared power!

If I were to look at the sisterhoods individually, I enjoy the Ananke and the Moirae from Greek mythology.  I like them because they represent a balance.  One side setting the standards and the other, enforcing them!  A perfect example of the laws of cause and effect! Continue reading

(Prose) Elys and the Mother Bear by Glenys Livingstone

 

Once upon a now, who knows for how long, there were women who lived most of their lives locked in one room of their vast houses. They didn’t know that their houses were vast, many storied and many roomed, because when the women were children they were repeatedly only told of this one beautiful room, where it was said their greatest happiness was to be found. Its colours, textures and furniture were sung about by the greatest authorities. And so it was that many a growing girl aspired to this room, and many a woman eagerly sought it; for to miss it, it was said, would be the greatest of tragedies, if not indeed the greatest of transgressions. But many more women simply tripped into it by accident, since everything else was a bit obscure. Continue reading

(Essay 2 Part 1) Poet as Initiate: A Rebirth of the Goddess & The Darkmother in Women’s Poetry in the 70’s by Louisa Calio

Poet as Initiate: A Rebirth of the Goddess & The Darkmother in Women’s Poetry in the 70’s[i]

(for my mother Rosa)

She is you, she is me, she is our mother’s murmurings, chantings, hummings all her days[ii]

Rites of Isis

When I first wrote those lines in the early 1970’s, I hadn’t yet named the process going on within me, nor had I discovered the works of Lucia Chiavola Birnbaum, which would link the dark mother to my own Sicilian and Neapolitan heritage, as well as our collective African roots. I had seen my life undergoing major transitions, a divorce, job loss, a descent, as well as explorations into new and submerged territories of learning, a “remembering” of African culture and religion as well as a reconnection to people from Sudan, Egypt and Ethiopia. Continue reading