(Essay 3) Magoist Calendar: The Mago Time inscribed in Sonic Numerology by Helen Hye-Sook Hwang

Art by Liz Darling

[Author’s Note: This is my latest research that has led me to restore the 13-month, 28-day Mago Calendar, which will be included at the end of its sequels. A revised version of these essays is coming as a monograph, Magoist Calendar, The Mago Time inscribed in Sonic Numerology, forthcoming in 2017 by Mago Books.]

THE SECOND CALENDAR

Then, the Earth had increasingly so much work in all regions. Biodiversity went overboard. The terrestrial song became uncontrollable. The initial calendar became defunct. Lifeforms were left uncoordinated. The Earth fell into disorder, as she had no one to tune the song of earthlings in harmony with the cosmic music of creativity. The Earth was in need of sentient beings who could undertake the task. Mago’s descendants were to be born. Humans were entrusted to cultivate the earthly sound property by the Nine Mago Creatrix. The Budoji writes: Continue reading

(Poem) Wildflower Moon Pyre and Prayer by Sara Wright

Photo by Sara Wright

I stood out under the thick gray clouds

And listened to the bird song,

the roaring river flood,

watched the swallows

soaring overhead

cutting the invisible link between

earth and sky

with sword like precision

and wished I could stay…

I stopped the thought

pulling back the thread –

Coming here at all

was a gift beyond imagining. Continue reading

(Essay 2) Divining the Masculine by Bart Everson

Do you believe in rocks?

Do you believe in rocks? Photo by Bart Everson

[This essay was originally published in the book, Finding the Masculine in Goddess’ Spiral: Men in Ritual, Community, and Service to the Goddess (2016, Immanion Press)].

These ideas are not very original. They must be amongst the oldest and most primal religious impulses. As a child of my era, however, I was drawn to scientific theories on the subject, in particular Gaia theory as formulated by James Lovelock and Lynn Margulis. (Oberon Zell formulated the same basic theory at the same time, but I was not familiar with his work). In simplest form, Gaia theory proposes a holistic view of the planet, looking at the Earth as a single organism. Naming the theory after the ancient Greek Earth goddess alienated many scientists but captured the popular imagination. Continue reading

(Book excerpt) Mother Medusa: Regenerative One by Glenys Livingstone Ph.D.

 

An essay from the forthcoming anthology Re-visioning Medusa: from Monster to Divine Wisdom edited by Glenys Livingstone Ph.D., Trista Hendren, and Pat Daly.

I first saw Her in myself, and gave voice to Her, after I had given a paper on Women and Religion, at the Women and Labour Conference in Australia in 1980; and the paper had attracted quite a bit of media attention. I felt myself to be seen as She was: that is, as some-thing completely out in and of, the wilderness – though I did not yet correctly name Her: I did not really know who She was at that time. I did not know my heritage then – my Hera-tage: it was only just beginning to emerge from the Great Below. As a method of processing this experience I had a dialogue with Society as an entity. It proceeded thus:

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(Prose) Spring Rain by Sara Wright

Photo by Sara Wright.

For the last couple of days we have had cloudy weather with a few irregular cloudbursts bringing much needed rain to our Juniper clustered high desert…When it rains earth tones deepen and the stones that line my paths standout like people. Perhaps they are Kachinas, after all.

Kachinas are on my mind because these holy people come down from the mountains to help the Tewa  pueblo peoples invoke the rain – gods that will help the crops grow. Squash, corn, and beans remind me that the Three Sister’s technology lives on. The Kachinas have been around since the winter solstice but they stay hidden until the spring dances begin at the pueblos… Continue reading

(Essay 1) Divining the Masculine by Bart Everson

Lion

Photo by Bart Everson

[This essay was originally published in the book, Finding the Masculine in Goddess’ Spiral: Men in Ritual, Community, and Service to the Goddess (2016, Immanion Press)].

I was raised in a tradition that glorified a masculine image of the divine. The church fathers further stipulated that although this father-god loved us, we did not deserve his love. He would condemn us all to eternal torment for our failings. His son embodied a different sort of masculine ideal, one of love and forgiveness and sacrifice, but only within the context defined by the father-god. Our sacred text was held to be inerrant, the only source for correct thinking. Salvation was available only through faith in these doctrines; all other paths were invalid.

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(Essay 2 Part 2) Poet as Initiate: A Rebirth of the Goddess & The Darkmother in Women’s Poetry in the 70’s by Louisa Calio

Redemption

Ntozake Shange did the same work of redemption when she created her choreopoem in the San Francisco Bay area: For Colored Girls who have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf. Performing her sacred rite in bars, cafes, galleries, women’s studies departments and other spots, this modern-day ritual would eventually emerge on Broadway in 1976 at the Booth Theater produced by Joe Papp. Seven women dressed in rainbow colors shared their stories, their loves, music and some of the grief of black women in a wilderness of human relationships where friends are capable of rape and husbands of murdering their children.  Continue reading

(Prose) The Grandmothers by Sara Wright

Photo by Sara Wright.

When I first arrived in Abiquiu the Pedernal stood out above the other mountains with its imposing triangular shape and flattened top. Initially this mesa fascinated me because Georgia O’Keeffe painted it so often, but after a while, although I liked the Pedernal it became one mountain amongst many others… However, I also knew that the Navajo’s mythical Changing Woman was born on this flat – topped mesa and that story continued to intrigue me.

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