(Prose) Cardea by Deanne Quarrie

“Ovid says of Cardea, apparently quoting a religious formula: ‘Her power is to open what is shut; to shut what is open.’ …”
Robert Graves, in the White Goddess

The Roman Goddess, Cardea, was keeper of the doors and had as Her principal protective emblem, a bough of Hawthorne. In the Celtic year, June is the month of the Oak, “Duir” and is considered the hinge of the year (the seventh of thirteen moon cycles).

She looks both forward and backward in time. Benefactress of crafts people, she lives in a starry castle at the hinge of the universe behind the North Wind. She is the Keeper of the Four Winds.

She is honored at her festival, Beltane, and is also honored during the month of June – which is known as the “hinge of the year.” Continue reading

(Art) The Empty Womb by Liz Darling

The experience of becoming a mother transformed the way I view the female body and the creation of life. Inspired by performing in Eve Ensler’s “The Vagina Monologues,” I use the vulva as a symbol of female power. Continue reading

(Book Excerpt 2) Single Mothers Speak on Patriarchy Ed. by Trista Hendren & Pat Daly

Introduction by Trista Hendren

Many people have wondered why I am going off track with my Goddess work to write about single mothers. To me, it’s all related.

The way we treat mothers is indicative of how we view The Mother.

Under patriarchy, the mother is feared and hated, quite crazily, both for her power and her weakness; everything a man cannot courageously accept about himself is projected onto his mother, or wife.” –Monica Sjoo & Barbara Mor[i]

To me, honoring real life mothers is just as important as setting aside our indoctrination to believe in a male God. Continue reading

(Book excerpt) Mother Medusa: Regenerative One by Glenys Livingstone Ph.D.

 

An essay from the forthcoming anthology Re-visioning Medusa: from Monster to Divine Wisdom edited by Glenys Livingstone Ph.D., Trista Hendren, and Pat Daly.

I first saw Her in myself, and gave voice to Her, after I had given a paper on Women and Religion, at the Women and Labour Conference in Australia in 1980; and the paper had attracted quite a bit of media attention. I felt myself to be seen as She was: that is, as some-thing completely out in and of, the wilderness – though I did not yet correctly name Her: I did not really know who She was at that time. I did not know my heritage then – my Hera-tage: it was only just beginning to emerge from the Great Below. As a method of processing this experience I had a dialogue with Society as an entity. It proceeded thus:

Continue reading

(Poetry) Nature’s Grace by Amina Rodriguez

Photography by Amina Rodriguez

Nature reached out to me…

Through the window in my room through a tree..

Through reaching branches and rustling leaves…

I grabbed on to her without hesitation..

Without a thought without question…

I felt her branches and grasped them tightly…

What a graceful invitation…

Unasked and unwarranted..

At the time what I understood was this thought which has stayed with me still… Continue reading

(Prose) Spring Rain by Sara Wright

Photo by Sara Wright.

For the last couple of days we have had cloudy weather with a few irregular cloudbursts bringing much needed rain to our Juniper clustered high desert…When it rains earth tones deepen and the stones that line my paths standout like people. Perhaps they are Kachinas, after all.

Kachinas are on my mind because these holy people come down from the mountains to help the Tewa  pueblo peoples invoke the rain – gods that will help the crops grow. Squash, corn, and beans remind me that the Three Sister’s technology lives on. The Kachinas have been around since the winter solstice but they stay hidden until the spring dances begin at the pueblos… Continue reading

(Prose) Re-membering Women’s Wisdom by Kaalii Cargill

Once upon a time, when “God was a woman”[i], anywhere from 35000 years ago until about 3500 years ago in some parts of the world, the life-giving power of Goddess was deeply respected. Consistent with this, women were respected as life-givers, and the functions of pregnancy, birth, and nurturing were valued as reflections of Great Nature,  the Mother of all. The rhythms and cycles of Nature were honoured in ceremonies and rituals, in daily practices that reflected a reverence for the life-giving principle.

Over the last few thousand years, this has changed so that the world in which we now live has little of this respect and acknowledgement. These changes have resulted in the loss of ancient ways of knowing. Continue reading

(Essay 1) Divining the Masculine by Bart Everson

Lion

Photo by Bart Everson

[This essay was originally published in the book, Finding the Masculine in Goddess’ Spiral: Men in Ritual, Community, and Service to the Goddess (2016, Immanion Press)].

I was raised in a tradition that glorified a masculine image of the divine. The church fathers further stipulated that although this father-god loved us, we did not deserve his love. He would condemn us all to eternal torment for our failings. His son embodied a different sort of masculine ideal, one of love and forgiveness and sacrifice, but only within the context defined by the father-god. Our sacred text was held to be inerrant, the only source for correct thinking. Salvation was available only through faith in these doctrines; all other paths were invalid.

Continue reading

(Meet Mago Contributor) Jack Dempsey, Ph.D.

Jack Dempsey (b. 1955) began writing freelance in New York City, and published Ariadne’s Brother: A Novel on the Fall of Bronze Age Crete in 1996. With his Ph.D. in Native and Early American Studies from Brown University, Jack wrote, edited and produced four books and two films in those fields, including New English Canaan by Thomas Morton of Merrymount; Mystic Fiasco: How the Indians Won The Pequot War, and Nani: A Native New England Story. Working on People of the Sea since the 1990s, Jack created the collaborative multimedia website Ancientlights.org, and revealed ancient Western astronomy with Continue reading

(Poem) We Are by Maya Daniel

Maya Daniel

I don’t bother on the algorithms claiming
My face has good proportions or not
We know our past– and our future

I am not afraid anymore
I was burned as a witch many times
I am woman– my place is in the struggle

I bring with me tuft of fresh flowers
Sea shells, and kid’s playing pebbles
But never forget one — my weapon Continue reading

(Essay) What can we do to create a peaceful revolution? by Genevieve Vaughan

Genevieve Vaughan

Realize that we are telling ourselves what is wrong all the time, but without understanding it.

Understand why the urge towards domination and exploitation happens. Devalue the values that motivate people to dominate, especially nations, classes, races, as well as individuals.

Look at this domination motivation and its effects. Identify the motivation and challenge and expose it at the different levels so that it will not grow back and cross-validate.

Spread a movement of people who will regularly do this. Continue reading