Mary Petiet

Mary_Petiet

Read all posts by Mary Petiet.

Mary Petiet is a reporter, writer and storyteller.

She has been actively locally for many years in the growing local farm to table movement as a founding member of Buy Fresh Buy Local Cape Cod, and as a regular contributor to the James Beard award winning Edible Cape Cod Magazine. A graduate of the University of St. Andrews, Mary has been published in several anthologies, Continue reading

Nicole Schwab’s book review of the Heart of the Labyrinth by Mary Petiet

the-heart-of-the-labyrinth_cover_front_72What if it really is as simple as changing our minds?

This is the central question of Nicole Schwab’s book, The Heart of the Labyrinth (Womancraft Publishing, 2014). This question paves the way for her eco-feminist approach to balancing the self and the environment. Schwab’s book is a parable as multilayered and complex as human nature, and it moves through the ages to probe the pure core of the self and the sustaining energy that connects all.

The Heart of the Labyrinth is a vital book, sending us deep into the self and the past to help us remember who we are, showing us how to reintegrate ourselves with nature through the elements of the divine feminine, so we can positively rebuild both our personal futures and the future of the planet. Schwab eloquently reminds us that in this time of social disconnect and planetary destruction, we each Continue reading

How do you say what The Mago Work is? by Helen Hye-Sook Hwang & Mago Circle Members

logo the mago work

The Creatrix represented by the three-color rays of light, patterned in nine corners.

It took many years for me to pronounce the communal nature of the Mago Work. Defining the Mago Work necessarily endows us with the bird’s eye view of the Great Goddess, the primordial consciousness of WE in S/HE. Early this year, I asked people to define the Mago Work and their definitions are illuminating about what this book ultimately seeks to achieve.[1] Continue reading

(Prose) The Goddess and the Song of the Universe by Mary Petiet

Venus-de-Laussel-vue-generale-noir

Wikimedia Commons

Mystics, poets, and scientists have long suspected that the universe is singing to us. Last September, scientists proved it when they recorded the sound of two black holes colliding billions of years ago.

The sound is the energy rippling from the crash, proving Einstein was right about both space ripples and the existence of black holes. The ripples sing in a C chord, and they are energy in motion, which scientists say will never cease travelling the universe.

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(Essay 2) Body Prayer by Mary Petiet

Photo credit: © 2015 Katherine Kaess Christensen

Photo credit: © 2015 Katherine Kaess Christensen

Julian knew harrowing times of uncertainty and found within them a quiet place of connection to divine love. She saw bubonic plague ravage Europe, killing half the population of Norwich, and historians speculate that she lost her own husband and children to the contagion.  She saw political upheaval as England  endured the Hundred Years war and was rocked by a series of peasant revolts, the largest led by Wat Tyler in 1381, as the people tried to wrest a more equal distribution of power and resources from the nobility. In 1378 she saw the church begin the Great Schism, a 68 year split between two pontificates, adding further disruption to an already hectic situation. She suffered an unnamed sickness so severe at age 30 that last rites were read, yet she revived, entered religious orders, and began to write of the profound visions she received during her illness. She is the first known English woman to have written a book.

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(Essay 1) Body Prayer by Mary Petiet

All shall be welland all shall be well and all manner of thing shall be well.’ Julian of Norwich

Photo credit: © 2015 Katherine Kaess Christensen

Photo credit: © 2015 Katherine Kaess Christensen

I am laying in shavasana, corpse pose, the final assimilating pose of any Hatha yoga practice. I am sprawled on my back on my yoga mat and my right hand receives a pleasant weight that I can wrap my arm around. I hold this weight and I know suddenly in that inner way of knowing that I am holding my own soul.

I come back from shavasana slowly and look at my friend on the mat beside me. She is near tears. She says, “I held my father in my right hand.” We regard each other across our mats, slowly, slowly, coming back to ourselves.

I have practiced yoga for eight years with the same teacher. In that time we have left the YMCA, where we used to practice, for the far more intimate church hall where we now meet. The core of our group consists of about eight women, and we gather twice weekly. My teacher is not a guru, she does not foster dependence. Rather she leads, and she gives us the tools to possibly lead ourselves.

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(Essay 2) Re-mything the Sacred Feminine by Mary Petiet

A symphony of voices is arising now at the time of our mother planet’s greatest peril. We remember and we awaken. We are powerful now because we are remembering.

One story we can re-myth is the story of the summer solstice. In the modern west, that solstice is traditionally the time of the sun deity, when the days are at their longest and the sun is at its zenith.  While the sun deity has been imagined differently by different cultures, as female in nature by the early Egyptians, the Germans and the Norse, the story we tell in the modern English speaking world is that the sun is male in aspect, and embodies the energy of the male. At the time of the solstice, the sun sits still for three days, high in the sky as it appears not to change position around the 21st   of June in the northern hemisphere.  Sol is the sun, and solstice means stand-still. The Earth stands still in the circle of the sun, pausing before its shift to shorter days.

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(Essay 1) Re-mything the Sacred Feminine by Mary Petiet

“A symphony of voices is arising now at the time of our mother planet’s greatest peril. We remember and we awaken. We are powerful now because we are remembering.”

The old stories no longer speak to us. The old stories underpin our current catastrophic global state. The old stories are men’s stories of supremacy and ownership, and these stories have supplanted the nurturing stories of the sacred feminine, stripping the living planet of its life force and driving peaceful nurture deep underground.

The old stories have failed us all as they hinder our happiness instead of ensuring it. The old stories have separated us from our universal mother and our humanity and led us to a state of hubris sufficient to deny the sacredness of the feminine and the sacredness of nature to the point of utter destruction.

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(Meet Mago Contributor) Mary Petiet

Mary_Petiet

Mary Petiet is a reporter, writer and storyteller.

She has been actively locally for many years in the growing local farm to table movement as a founding member of Buy Fresh Buy Local Cape Cod, and as a regular contributor to the James Beard award winning Edible Cape Cod Magazine. A graduate of the University of St. Andrews, Mary has been published in several anthologies, including Jesus, Muhammad and the Goddess, by The Girl God (February 2016), and Wildness: Voices of the Sacred Landscape, with Homebound Publications (June 2016). She has also published a selection of essays and articles in a variety of journals and magazines while working locally as a news reporter. Her book Minerva’s Owls is forthcoming in April 2017 with Homebound Publications. Follow her on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/MaryPetiet/