Jude Lally

Jude Lally

View all posts by Jude Lally.

Jude Lally is an artist, a writer and holder of sacred space.

She grew up a few miles from Loch Lomond, where the river Leven meets the mighty River Clyde, on the West Coast of Scotland.

She gained her masters degree in Human Ecology at the University of Strathclyde (Glasgow, Scotland) with her thesis ‘Fire in the Head, Heart and Hand: A Study of the Goddess Brigit as Goddess Archetype and her Relevance to Cultural Activists in Contemporary Scotland’. Continue reading

(Prose 2) The Cailleach: The Ancestral Mother of Scotland By Jude Lally

cailleach_edited

Cailleach – Photo by Jude Lally

A Wild and Ancient Site

There are many sites across Scotland and Ireland relating to the Cailleach for there wasn’t just one Cailleach as she had many sisters. Less than one hundred miles from where I grew up is the long loch of Loch Tay in Scotland. If you were to take to the hills until you reach Glen Tay, then continue onto Tigh na Cailliche (Glen Cailleach), you will come across the little structure of Tigh Nam Bodach, the Shrine of the Cailleach. It is possibly the only surviving shrine to the Cailleach in all of Scotland.

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(Prose 1) The Cailleach: The Ancestral Mother of Scotland by Jude Lally

cailleach_edited

Cailleach – Photo by Jude Lally

“She is a symbolic personification of a cosmos that has been in place since time immemorial, certainly since before human society.”                            Gearoid O Crualaoich (2003)

While growing up my Samhain’s (Halloween’s) were all about Guising – diving into my grandmother’s bag of old clothes and wondrous fabrics and piecing costumes together. Guising was all about dressing up so that when the ancestors and spirits came through from the otherworld, they wouldn’t know who was who as we were all in disguise. I can remember the thrill of running from neighbours’ houses imagining the ancestors and spirits embodied in the night’s winds – swimming through treetops and swooping down to chase us while blowing up piles of fallen leaves for dramatic effect.

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(Essay 4) Radical Doll Making From Willendorf to Today: The Relevance of an Ancient Tradition by Jude Lally

Doll in Folklore

Breejah. Art doll by Jude Lally

Breejah. Art doll by Jude Lally

Before she died, Vasalisa was given a doll by her mother and advised to feed the doll and ask its advice when she needed it. Clarissa Pinkola Estes (1995) explains that the relationship between Vasalisa and her doll symbolizes a form of empathic magic between a woman and her intuition. While many women find their intuition weak, she explains that this is something which through practice can be strengthened and regained. When this occurs, it is as if the handing down of intuitive reliance between a woman and all females of her lines who have gone before her, this long river of women, has been dammed. Continue reading

(Essay 3) Radical Doll Making From Willendorf to Today: The Relevance of an Ancient Tradition by Jude Lally

Jude LallyRadical Doll Making

I call myself a radical doll maker taking this practice back to its roots. Back to roots of dolls as tools of magic, of holding intention, created and used within ritual. In a world that views female stone figurines as male pornography this is indeed a radical art!

I choose the gatherer’s story. I choose to spend time with my sisters in a sacred creative circle where together we weave magic envisioning it stretching out through space and time to Continue reading

(Essay 2) Radical Doll Making From Willendorf to Today: The Relevance of an Ancient Tradition by Jude Lally

Old Antlered One. Art doll by Jude Lally

Old Antlered One. Art doll by Jude Lally

Sacred Becoming the Political

In looking into the theories of the stone goddess figurines and the artists of the cave art, it doesn’t take long before we become entangled in archaeological dogma. In 2009 the Woman of Hohle Fels was found, a carved female figurine dating back to 35,000 BCE. Nowell and Chang (2014) reviewed the scholarship around this finding as well as the mass media reporting. As news of the figurine was reported in the mass media, she was reported with headlines such as “World’s first Page 3 Girl”, “Smut carved from Continue reading

(Essay 1) Radical Doll Making From Willendorf to Today: The Relevance of an Ancient Tradition by Jude Lally

Guardian. Art doll by Jude Lally

Guardian. Art doll by Jude Lally

When I look at the ancient stone female figurines (such as the Woman of Willendorf), I wonder at about the people who made them and how those people experienced the world. While we will never know for sure there are many theories out there offering varying perspectives.

Some of these lead to damaging mindsets while others offer life giving outlooks. As a doll maker I suggest that these prehistoric figurines were the beginnings of the practice of doll making. This paper will examine the relevance of the doll in a tradition of Goddess honoring spirituality. Continue reading

(Imbolc essay) The Story of an Imbolc Doll by Jude Lally

Jude Lally Celtic Goddess DollSo far it has been an odd winter here in the foothills of the Appalachians. While we have had frosty mornings and cold crystal clear nights with a host of stars, there have been some very, very warm days in between. This weather tricks the mind, which tricks the body and has left me feeling robbed of reflective days hidden in my cave. But winter thankfully has still a while to go and I hope for her to reclaim her throne.

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(Meet Mago Contributor) Jude Lally

Jude LallyJude Lally is an artist, a writer and holder of sacred space.

She grew up a few miles from Loch Lomond, where the river Leven meets the mighty River Clyde, on the West Coast of Scotland.

She gained her masters degree in Human Ecology at the University of Strathclyde (Glasgow, Scotland) with her thesis ‘Fire in the Head, Heart and Hand: A Study of the Goddess Brigit as Goddess Archetype and her Relevance to Cultural Activists in Contemporary Scotland’.

She moved to Asheville, NC in 2009 where she runs her Celtic Soul School offering a program of workshops and online course created around a sacred circle reclaiming the tools of female shamanism, sacred creativity and women’s mysteries.

She is a radical doll maker taking the craft back to its roots of honour, ritual and magic. Her making process is a ritual of meditative state – a co-creative dance between the worlds. The doll is a sacred container for the divine which weaves its own circle through space and time urging us to take up our own responsibilities as living ancestors.

Website: www.celticsoulcraft.com

Facebook: Celtic Soul Craft: https://www.facebook.com/Celtic-Soul-Craft-127237380645774/

 

Ancient Mothers of Loch Lomond: https://www.facebook.com/The-Ancient-Mothers-of-Loch-Lomond-857302574365098/