(Poem) Changing Woman Speaks by Sara Wright

Photo by Iren Schio

The two climbed steep hills

and rubble to reach the meadow.

The flat-topped mountain peered down

at the women

gathering stones (from her body)

as if they were diamonds.

Amber, moss, pearl white,

rose red and orange,

gray and ebony – a luminescence

emanated from each,

almost as if the moon had

infused each flake and boulder

with her translucent light. Continue reading

(Prose) The Feast of the New Grain/Lammas: The Turning of the Wheel by Sara Wright

Photo by Sara Wright

The Turning of the Wheel

Today heavy mist shrouds the apple trees and rises like puffs of smoke over the mountains. Every twig is still covered with lush green leaves and every time I look out a window I feel that gratitude pulsing through me – the wonder of being alive. A brilliant green frog inhabits my toad pond. Last night a Datura blossom literally opened before my eyes etched with pale lavender – a moonflower of exquisite fragrance and beauty, and if anything, I appreciate these moon blossoms here more than I did in the desert. Continue reading

(Prose) Mother Daughter Betrayal by Sara Wright

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As a child I adored my very distant mother and did everything I could to please her, including becoming a second mother to my baby brother at four years old. I remember tenderly holding him and giving him his bottles.

Is that why I became so devoted to the divine image of Mary, Queen of Heaven the moment I was exposed to her at the convent garden that I secretly visited each day on my way home from kindergarten? Continue reading

(Poem) Wildflower Moon Pyre and Prayer by Sara Wright

Photo by Sara Wright

I stood out under the thick gray clouds

And listened to the bird song,

the roaring river flood,

watched the swallows

soaring overhead

cutting the invisible link between

earth and sky

with sword like precision

and wished I could stay…

I stopped the thought

pulling back the thread –

Coming here at all

was a gift beyond imagining. Continue reading

(Prose) Spring Rain by Sara Wright

Photo by Sara Wright.

For the last couple of days we have had cloudy weather with a few irregular cloudbursts bringing much needed rain to our Juniper clustered high desert…When it rains earth tones deepen and the stones that line my paths standout like people. Perhaps they are Kachinas, after all.

Kachinas are on my mind because these holy people come down from the mountains to help the Tewa  pueblo peoples invoke the rain – gods that will help the crops grow. Squash, corn, and beans remind me that the Three Sister’s technology lives on. The Kachinas have been around since the winter solstice but they stay hidden until the spring dances begin at the pueblos… Continue reading

(Prose) The Grandmothers by Sara Wright

Photo by Sara Wright.

When I first arrived in Abiquiu the Pedernal stood out above the other mountains with its imposing triangular shape and flattened top. Initially this mesa fascinated me because Georgia O’Keeffe painted it so often, but after a while, although I liked the Pedernal it became one mountain amongst many others… However, I also knew that the Navajo’s mythical Changing Woman was born on this flat – topped mesa and that story continued to intrigue me.

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(Prose) Snowy: Tribute to a “Spirit Animal” by Sara Wright

Photo Credit: Sara Wright

Photo Credit: Sara Wright

(4/10/13 – 1/22/16)

What do I mean by the words Spirit Animal? Indigenous peoples take it for granted that each animal has an Elder Spirit who watches over that particular species. Most of the time this Elder Spirit stays in the other world as a discarnate being. But there are exceptions and sometimes these Spirit Animals cross over to our world. Some come as teachers, some come to warn of impending danger, some give their lives so other can live, some come to bless a child or to act as a protector, healer or personal guide, all embody Grace and love with a capital “L.”

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(Poem Prose 2) Witches in the Weeds by Sara Wright

sara-owl

Wikimedia Commons

Per Wikipedia, Datura “was known as an essential ingredient of potions and witches’ brews.” The word witch was first coined by the King James version of the Bible, which appeared in the 1600’s. A women’s holocaust occurred in Europe and the United States (Salem, Massachusetts, Abiquiu, New Mexico) in the 16th and 17th centuries when thousands, perhaps a few million rural women of all ages were burned as witches.  In a nutshell, women have been healers since ancient times. When men became “doctors” they took over the role of healer from women, and conveniently dispensed with the latter by burning them alive.

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(Poem Prose 1) Witches in the Weeds by Sara Wright

sara-owl

Wikimedia Commons

There she is in flight,

a shooting star on fire.

There she spirals eyeless

her blue wind births chaos.

There she moans bitterly

churning up dark waters.

There she plows fiercely

heaving up mountains. Continue reading

(Poem) Hecate’s Moon by Sara Wright

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Guadalupe by Armando – Adrian Lopez. Photo by Sara Wright. For more about the artist, see www. armandolopez.com.

Lupita, Guadalupe –

Your agave points of light glow in grave darkness.

 

Hecate’s Moon is Red.

The Raven slices the sky into shards.

The River catches shivering stars.

 

We remember the First Mother… Continue reading

(Prose) Bleached Tree Roots by Sara Wright

Election Dream: November 9thSaraWpicture3.png

Just an image: I see bleached, broken, slashed, and severed tree roots scattered over the entire horizon – which seem to stretch out in front of me in all directions – the ground, as far as I can see, has become a wasteland.

 

Continue reading